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D-Day landings: The Queen and President Obama pay tribute

The Queen was a girl during the D-Day landings when so many people laid down their lives for freedom. On Friday, the emotion was written on her bearing as the royal matriarch paid tribute to those who fell on the beaches of Normany 70 years ago. Surrounded by war graves in Bayeux, the first town to be liberated from the Nazis, she bowed her head in silent reflection after laying a wreath in honour of the war dead. Ten miles away President Obama made his own act of remembrance at the American War Cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer where almost 10,000 US troops lie.

The Queen pays her respects at Bayeux to the heroes of the Normandy landings who on June 6, 1944 liberated France, turning the tide of World War II. Photo: © Getty Images

The sovereign, who was joined by Prince Philip, Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall, said the occasion was "an opportunity to reflect on their experiences and the incredible sacrifices that were made". Photo: © Getty Images

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls with the British royals at Bayeux Cathedral. Despite the presence of so many world figures it was the veterans who took centre stage and were cheered by the townspeople on their return. Photo: © Getty Images

King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima of the Netherlands join the commemoration ceremony in Arromanches, Normandy. Photo: © Rex

President Barack Obama greets veterans at the American War Cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer. He told them they and their comrades "turned the tide in that common struggle for freedom". 

The Camerons at Bayeux cathedral; the Prime Minster spoke of the gratitude owed to the fallen veterans. 

A piper plays a lament on Gold Beach as landing craft from the Royal Marines arrive at Arromanche on June 6, 2014 in Arromanches Les Bains, France. Photo: © Getty Images

D-Day veteran Victor Walker, 88, formerly of HMS Versatile, arrives at Bayeux Cathedral for the service of remembrance. 

Michel Colas shows his grandsons Samuel Colas and Rafael Schneider graves at the American Cemetery where 10,000 troops are buried. Photo: © Getty Images

Veterans salute those who did not come back during the playing of the 'Last Post' in Colleville-sur-Mer.  

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