Print Comment Send newsitem

(Almost) at the end of the world

Torres del Paine, O'Higgins Park, Puerto Natales, Tierra del Fuego, Magdalena Island... Chilean Patagonia is an amazing land of spectacular changing landscapes, unreal and unspoiled. Our photo gallery will give you a hint of what's out there on the edge of the world.

For many centuries Patagonia was the limit of the known world. A mythical land, distant and strange, inhabited by giant beings of unknown and unfamiliar customs and habits. The name Patagonia comes from the word meaning 'giant' that Magellan used on his 1520 voyage of exploration to describe the natives of this remote region of South America. Since ancient times, the few sailors who reached this land did so believing they had reached the gates of 'Terra Australis Incognita', - the legendary southernmost continent, hypothesised as far back as Aristotle and placed at the bottom of charts by European mapmakers from the fifteenth century onwards. Today, 600 years later, Patagonia remains, to a great extent, a wild, uncharted territory. This vast territory, shared by Argentina and Chile, is home to a great diversity of landscapes: mountains, fjords, lakes, islands, glaciers... and there are many reasons to think it still deserves the name of the edge of the world.

Use the left and right arrow keys to view the images


Chilean Patagonia
Situated between the Andes and the Patagonian plateau, the spectacular Torres del Paine National Park boasts vast lakes surrounded by glacier-capped peaks that rise to heights of over 3,000 metres / © Chile Tourist Board 

Chilean Patagonia
The mantle of forests in the Queulat Park is a haven for many species of wildlife, including a host of exotic birds, making it a popular destination among those who come seeking the unspoiled natural spaces at the ends of the earth / © Chile Tourist Board 

Chilean Patagonia
The Patagonia Express leaving the pier at Puyuhuapi en route to San Rafael Lagoon / © Chile Tourist Board 

Chilean Patagonia
Here seen as it passes alongside the Baker River, the Carretera Austral – Chile's Southern Highway – is over 1,200 kilometres in length and runs through rural Patagonia; the ambitious infrastructure project has connected this sparsely populated area with the rest of the country after centuries of isolation / © Chile Tourist Board 

Chilean Patagonia
The Patagonia Express is a stylish high-speed catamaran designed especially to navigate the southern fjords / © Chile Tourist Board 

Chilean Patagonia
After a long drive along the Carretera Austral and a boat trip across a quiet bay, the beautiful Puyuhuapi Lodge & Spa offers a perfect spot to relax / © Chile Tourist Board 

a-hotel-explora
Located near the waterfall Salto Chico, whose name means 'little fall', the Hotel Salto Chico enjoys a privileged view of the Paine Massif / © Hotel Salto Chico 

Chilean Patagonia
Lush rain forests, waterfalls, fjords, glacier-capped mountains and rivers are the stars of the Queulat National Park / © Chile Tourist Board 

Chilean Patagonia
The deafening roar of ice breaking from the glacier is an unmistakable part of the awe-inspiring natural spectacle of the Laguna San Rafael National Park / © Chile Tourist Board 

Chilean Patagonia
Grey Lake, Salto Grande waterfall, the Blue Lagoon and the Sierra del Toro viewpoint are just some of the spectacular features of Torres del Paine National Park / © Chile Tourist Board 

Chilean Patagonia
The wild and rugged landscape makes much of Chile's southern territory difficult to reach by land, while sea and air access are hampered by extreme winter weather conditions / © Chile Tourist Board 

Add comment

Please type the characters that appear on the image in order to send your comment:



  • Please note, all comments are those of readers and do not represent the opinion of Hellomagazine.com
  • Hellomagazine.com reserves the right to remove comments it considers offensive or not relevant
  • Please focus on the topic