Victoria's Secret model hits back at 'skinny shaming' on Instagram

hellomagazine.com

Victoria's Secret model Bridget Malcolm is the latest star to defend her slim frame on Instagram.

The 23-year-old shared a picture of herself in a sports bra and leggings, writing: "Can we STOP with the skinny shaming please? I am extremely fit and healthy and am not in the slightest way anorexic.

"I have worked hard to look like this and am proud of my body. I may not be the curviest, but I am a woman who has every right to look the way I do."



She added: "Maybe today take a look inside yourself and wonder why you feel the need to shame strangers all over the Internet about their bodies. Peace and love to you all; let's change the conversation."

Bridget made her debut on the Victoria's Secret catwalk earlier this month.

Backstage at the show, a fellow model shut down a reporter after being asked what she was going to eat after the show.



Magdalena Frackowiak refused to answer the question because "You'll make me look like an idiot."

She added: "It will seem like I'm starving myself and can't wait for the show to end, to eat."

Another model to call Instagram users out for body shaming is Gigi Hadid. The star took addressed her critics, revealing she made the decision when she realised she had "let the negativity get to me a little".

A photo posted by Gigi Hadid (@gigihadid) on



In the heartfelt post, the blonde beauty explained that while she doesn't "have the same body type as the other models", she loves the world of fashion and is working hard to make a career in modelling, making the most of the industry which is "ready for a change".

"No, I don't have the same body type as the other models in shows," she wrote to her 6.4 million followers. "No, I don't think I'm the best at any given show. Yes, I want to have a unique walk but I also know I have to improve.

"You can make up all the reasons you think I am where I am, but really, I'm a hard worker that's confident in myself, one that came at a time where the fashion industry was ready for a change. I'm just doing my job. I represent a body image that wasn't accepted in high-fashion before, and I'm very lucky to be supported by the designers, stylists, and editors that I am: ones that know this is fashion, it's art; it can never stay the same."