HELLO! royal tour diary: day one in Lesotho

Emily Nash

On day one of our visit to Lesotho, HELLO! had a sneak preview of Sentebale’s Mamohato Children’s Centre ahead of Prince Harry's arrival on Thursday. After a long journey into the tiny, landlocked "Kingdom of the Sky", we were shown around the impressive 96-bed facility in Thaba Bosiu. Set against the stunning background of the rocky plateau, considered to be the birthplace of the Basotho nation, the centre will host camps to help children overcome the stigma surrounding their diagnosis with HIV.



Boasting sweeping views of the valley below, the centre features several personal and poignant reminders that Sentebale was founded by Prince Harry and Lesotho's Prince Seeiso in memory of their late mothers.

Named after Seeiso's mother Queen Mamohato, it also features the Diana, Princess of Wales Hall and a welcome centre dedicated to Olga Powell, Prince William and Harry’s beloved former nanny.


Excitement was at fever pitch ahead of the official opening ceremony and seemed to have spread across the capital Maseru.

Journalists following the royal visit were treated to moving music from the choir of St Bernadette's School for the visually impaired, which is supported by the charity Sentebale.

Feeling weary after a long flight from the UK and a dramatic descent into the tiny, landlocked African nation, hearing the children singing in perfect harmony, with huge smiles on their faces, about their hopes for a cure for HIV/Aids was truly humbling. Of the school’s 75 students, all aged between eight and 17, 28 have been orphaned by the disease.

Good morning #Lesotho! #PrinceHarry #Sentebale #RoyalVisitSA #LesothosChildren @hellomag

A photo posted by Emily Nash (@emynash) on


But Sentebale is helping them to continue their education and protect their own health against all the odds. Seeing the beaming face of eight-year-old Relebohi Lebeko, who was born blind, playing in goal on a pitch donated by the charity, showed just what a difference it is making to their lives.

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