george-2

George Michael's former manager says he knew he would die young

Emmy Griffiths

George Michael's former manager Rob Kahane has revealed that the late singer used to be certain that he would die young.

During an interview with Billboard magazineRob recalled that his sister would read George's tarot cards. He said: "He was obsessed with saying 'I know I'm going to die young.' He'd say, 'It's OK. I've had a great life.'" He also spoke about the singer's grief after losing his partner Anselmo Feleppa in 1993. "When he lost Anselmo, I thought he was going to do something bad to himself," he admitted "I had people stay with him." He confirmed that he had been in touch with the singer shortly before his death, saying: "I called him, and he said, 'I'm good.' He sounded fine."

george-2VIEW GALLERY

George's former manager spoke about the late singer

The star's partner of five years Fadi Fawaz has recently opened up about speaking to the police about the singer's death on Christmas Day. He told Daily Mail: "We were very much in love, very much together. Why would I be there if we weren't together? I was there the last day of his life. I was ther. "The police have been amazing. They have been supportive. They have done what normally happens when someone dies. They have not been accusing me, never; they have been very supportive." The hairdresser confirmed he was the one to find George on Christmas morning, and told the Mirror: "I never saw him. I fell asleep in my car and I never saw him that night. The police know everything - that's the most important thing."

george-mVIEW GALLERY

George died on Christmas Day aged 53

Following George's inclusive post-mortem results, police have been investigating his death and have confirmed that they are not treating it as suspicious. In a statement, the Thames Valley police wrote: "As part of Thames Valley Police's investigation on behalf of Oxfordshire Coroner into this unexplained but non-suspicious death officers are establishing facts which include taking statements. This is standard practice in cases such as this to allow the coroner to determine the circumstances of the death."

More on: