Bob Geldof 'half-expected' death of daughter Peaches

hellomagazine.com

Bob Geldof has admitted he "half-expected" the death of his daughter Peaches Geldof, but says he still finds the pain of her loss "unbearable". Peaches passed away in April last year aged just 25, and her heartbroken father said he feels her with him "every second of every day", adding that she is still "very present".

Bob was discussing the deaths of three important women in his life – his mother, his ex-wife Paula Yates and his daughter - during an interview on Ireland's RTE Radio 1. "Part of me kind of half-expected it with Peaches, to be honest with you – the way she was carrying on, there's nothing you can do about it," the 64-year-old said.

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Bob Geldof has revealed he "half-expected" the death of his daughter Peaches



"This thing of being forever 25, in my head, that's unbearable, simply because of that cliché – you are not supposed to see your children die.

"But she is the one who is with me every second of the day, and she is the one who bangs into my consciousness, especially in any down moment… where I am not doing something. She's very present.

"Time does not heal, it accommodates. But it is not accommodating this."

Bob also revealed that he had decided to propose to his partner of 20 years, Jeanne Marine, the day after Peaches' funeral to "let some air into the room" and to help him through his "suffocating grief".

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Bob proposed to his long-term partner Jeanne Marine on the day after Peaches' funeral



"You just push it (grief) to the side until it forces its way into your foreconscious again, and then you have to move it and place it back to this deep dark dungeon. I thought, 'I have to do something'.

"I had already planned to ask her to marry me on her birthday. And then, because of Peaches, I thought it would be entirely appropriate.

"And then we buried her – and the next day – I decided to let some air into the room. We were suffocating with grief, and we needed air in the room, and we needed light in that air."

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