Thomas Cohen breaks silence on late wife Peaches Geldof

Gemma Strong

Thomas Cohen paid a touching tribute to his late wife Peaches Geldof as he took to the stage for his first solo gig. The 25-year-old might have moved on romantically, but he proved that Peaches – the mother of his two children – is still very much in his heart as he performed to an intimate crowd.

It is the first time that Tom has opened up about his heartache since Peaches passed away from a drugs overdose two years ago, leaving behind sons Phaedra and Astala, now three and two.

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Tom Cohen paid a touching tribute to his late wife Peaches Geldof at his first solo gig

According to the Mirror, he told the crowd that one song was about living in Kent – where he and Peaches had a home. It included the lyrics: "You couldn't make it through. Time to say goodbye. Holding onto each other and sing to one another, everyone knows the house feels so cold. Just to say goodbye."

In another track, he reportedly sang: "Sleeping alone, it's hard to go on in our country home, where we belong. Sing to me one last time. Your sun is still shining. Hold my hand as the sea become a storm."

Among those watching Tom perform were Peaches' sister Pixie Geldof, as well as the musician’s new girlfriend Daisy Lowe. Tom and Daisy are thought to have become close during a New Year's holiday with mutual friends, including Alexa Chung, Nick Grimshaw and Pixie, and been pictured together in recent weeks.

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The 25-year-old musician recently started a new relationship with model Daisy Lowe

Meanwhile, Peaches' father Bob Geldof has admitted he felt angry with his daughter following her untimely death. "At the time, with Peaches I mean, immediately afterwards, I was extremely angry with her and probably that was the energy you discerned, it wasn't a positive thing at all," he candidly told the Mirror.

Speaking about both Peaches and her mother Paula Yates, who also died from a heroin overdose, he added: "I watch against myself getting drippy or soppy or sentimental about either of them, although I loved them to the core of my soul and still do.

"I'm not incontinent with my blubbing but when the need arises, I do. I think male crying is somehow different, it seems to come and last a bit, and then it goes."

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