The Duchess of Cornwall’s tears for victims of domestic abuse

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The Duchess of Cornwall was moved to tears when she heard from victims of domestic violence on Wednesday. The royal spent time with women who have survived domestic abuse and listened to stories of those who tragically lost their lives at the hands of their partners.

A teary-eyed Camilla heard from several women who told of their devastating experiences. Among them was Diana Parkes, the mother of victim Joanna Brown. Diana opened up about her daughter, who was killed by her violent husband, a British Airways Captain Robert Brown, in 2010.

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Camilla broke down in tears when she heard the tragic stories of domestic abuse

After hearing the emotional story, Camilla comforted Diana and vowed she would do anything within her power "to help."

The 68-year-old royal attended the event in Oval, which was run by SafeLives, a national charity dedicated to ending domestic abuse in the UK. Through its network of domestic violence advisors, SafeLives helped 67,500 high risk victims, as well as their 76,000 children.

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The Duchess comforted Diana Parkes, whose daughter died at the hands of her partner

During Wednesday's event, Camilla, who has campaigned on the issue of rape and sexual assault, spoke about her desire to see the issue of domestic abuse on the national stage. "It’s so important that people like yourselves speak up otherwise we gloss over it. And this is too important an issue to ignore," she said.

Addressing Diana she said: "Another incredibly brave lady. Stories like this just have to be aired otherwise domestic abuse becomes a taboo subject."

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The royal has vowed to help the charity with their work

"I want to do anything I can to help raise this issue. All of you going around and talking about it does create awareness," she added.

Camilla intends to look into what she could do to support the charity after hearing the moving stories. "I want to help in any way I can," she said.

Dianna Barra, chief executive of SafeLives, praised the Duchess for her interest and said: "The idea behind our organisation is that you have one person to talk to. That advisor will work with victims to find the best resources to help them on everything from housing to practical help with their children. It is wrap-around care."

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