Michael Jackson's Neverland ranch goes on sale for $100million

hellomagazine.com

Michael Jackson's Neverland ranch has been put on the market for $100million. The Santa Barbara residence famously once included fairground rides, a zoo and even its own fire station, which have now been removed, although the 2,700-acre estate has retained the private railway and train station that Michael had built, a 50-seat cinema and the iconic floral Neverland clock.

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Michael Jackson's Neverland ranch has been put on the market



Six years after the singer's death, Neverland has also been renamed Sycamore Valley Ranch. It includes a swimming pool, tennis court, basketball court and a pair of lakes. The main house is a 12,000 sq ft Normandy-style mansion, where Michael resided, with staff quarters attached, and there are several guest houses.

The Thriller superstar bought the property, which is located 130 miles north of LA, for $19.5million in 1988 and he lived there for more than 15 years. Michael moved out of Neverland after his 2005 acquittal on sexual molestation charges following a high-profile trial, stating that he felt his home has been "violated" by police searches carried out during the investigation.

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The property - listed for $100million - famously once included fairground rides



Due to financial struggles, real estate company Colony Capital LLC bailed Michael out in 2008 after he defaulted on a $24.5million loan he owed on the property, creating a joint venture with the singer with the intention to resell Neverland.

It is thought that the annual upkeep for the estate was a staggering $3million, with up to 54 full-time paid staff manning the property.

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The 2,700 acre estate includes a tennis court, swimming pool and two lakes



The site is now being jointly sold by Sotheby's and Hilton & Hyland. Estate agents have warned off fans hoping to get a glimpse inside the iconic property, telling the Wall Street Journal that anyone wanting to view it would be subjected to "extensive prequalification". "We're not going to be giving tours," said Suzanne Perkins of Sotheby's International Realty.

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