jurassic park joseph mazzello

Jurassic Park child star Joseph Mazzello makes epic comeback - see him all grown up!

The actor played young Tim in the 1993 Stephen Spielberg film

Sharnaz Shahid

He became a child star after starring in classics such as Jurassic Park and The River Wild in the early nineties, and almost 25 years later, Joseph Mazzello is ready to make a sensational comeback to the big screen! The 36-year-old was 11 years old when he played Tim in Stephen Spielberg's film about dinosaurs, and now he is returning to play Queen's bass player John Deacon in the highly-anticipated film, Bohemian Rhapsody. On Tuesday evening, the actor hit the red carpet in London for the movie premiere for the Freddie Mercury biopic.

Joseph Mazzello at the Bohemian Rhapsody premiere in London

Looking almost unrecognisable, Joseph put on a dapper display in a black tailored suit which was teamed with a crisp white shirt and a slick hairstyle. Touching upon his breakout role, the Hollywood actor recently told Lorraine Kelly: "[Bohemian Rhapsody] is kind of the Jurassic Park of my adult career, I would say, just with the scope and scale of it and the sort of anticipation." On the night, he was joined by his co-stars Rami Malek, who plays Freddie Mercury, Gwilym Lee who takes on the role of Brian May and former EastEnders star Ben Hardy who plays Roger Taylor.

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The actor was also joined by his co-stars

Bohemian Rhapsody focuses on the celebration of Queen, their music and their extraordinary lead singer Freddie. The late singer defied stereotypes and shattered convention to become one of the most beloved entertainers on the planet. The film traces the meteoric rise of the band through their iconic songs and revolutionary sound. Although the movie has been in ten years in the making, the production team received the full support of Brian May and Roger Taylor, who also attended the premiere. Brian recently told The Mirror: "I took a bit of convincing. Whether [or not] the film should be made because Freddie was so unique - but if we don't somebody else will. And we want to make sure it is done right."

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