Prince William to start flying with East Anglia Air Service in summer

hellomagazine.com

Prince William will start flying as an air ambulance pilot in the summer. He has been taking exams in preparation for his new role with East Anglia Air Service. It had already been announced that William would join the service, based at Cambridge Airport, in spring – but now it's been revealed that he won't actually be operational until a few months later.

The pilot-Prince will welcome a few months breathing space as he will have to juggle his new job with a second baby. The Duchess of Cambridge, née Kate Middleton, is expecting a brother or sister for Prince George in mid-April.

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William starts the new job in spring but will not take the controls of a helicopter until summer

He is expected to donate his £40,000 a year salary to charity. A typical day will involve an eight-hour shift starting at 7am or the follow-on night shift from 4.30pm to 1am. Crews usually deal with five call outs a day but can fly up to ten flights in one shift. The Prince will have fours days on followed by four days off.

The service operates two helicopters out of Cambridge and Norwich airports which are both within 50 miles of the couple's new home Anmer Hall.

In 2011, Kate talked about her fears for William when he was on duty in his previous job as a search and rescue pilot in Anglesey, where he was often operating in dangerous weather.

"I always worry when William goes off on a mission," she told another service wife."I find it very difficult. You always fear for them, not knowing if something is going to ­happen, and it can be very hard."

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He will work closely with doctors and paramedics

This new role will be slightly different. Aviation consultant Gerry Hermer said."The Prince's job will be to react to 999 calls as required by ambulance control. He will be deployed in any emergency medical situation where using a helicopter will be in the best interests of the patient.

"He is already a qualified professional pilot and the main difference between this and his previous role is there will be less flying over sea and the helicopter will not be equipped with a winch.

He added: "He will also be dealing with more injured people than he is perhaps used to. In some cases this can be quite distressing but I'm sure he is well equipped to cope with that. Ultimately he will be part of a crew and will sit with them all day so they are likely to become very close."

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