lizzo

Singer Lizzo talks body positivity in her latest interview with Rolling Stone

HELLO!'s Body Work columnist Alex Light is sick of the obsession around Lizzo's body...

Alex Light

In Lizzo's latest interview with Rolling Stone, the 31-year-old said: "My body is not a trend." A bit louder for the people in the back, please Lizzo? She might be one of the most famous performers in the world right now, but it’s not just her talent for singing, rapping and dancing that has got people talking, unfortunately. 

The star has been vocal about accepting her body as it is and silencing society’s demands that she slim herself down, and she has truly cemented her status as a poster girl for the body positivity movement - but she has faced backlash from commentators who don’t believe her body is something to be celebrated.

lizzo

Read: Why 2020 is the year we stop comparing ourselves to others on social media

Earlier this month, fitness celebrity Jillian Michaels weighed in: “Why aren’t we celebrating her music? ‘Cause it isn’t going to be awesome if she gets diabetes. I’m just being honest. Like, I love her music. Like, my kid loves her music. But there’s never a moment where I’m like, ‘And I’m so glad she’s overweight!’’

Hmm. Sounds like fat-shaming dressed up as faux concern to me. Anyway, luckily a host of Lizzo supporters jumped in to defend the star. Lizzo herself hasn’t directly addressed the comments, but in her latest interview with Rolling Stone, she expressed her desire for the narrative around her body to stop. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Lizzo (@lizzobeeating) on

 

“I’m so much more than that,” she said. “Because I actually present that, I have a whole career. It’s not a trend.” She went on to say that she wants to be celebrated for her music, and not seen as ‘brave’. 

Read: ASOS launches exciting online tool that shows clothes on different body types

“I’ve come to terms with body dysmorphia and evolved,” she added. “The body positive movement is doing the same thing. We’re growing together, and it’s growing pains, but I’m just glad that I’m attached to something so organic and alive.”

The interviewer notes that she seems "exhausted" about talking about her body, and I get it. Why do we have to be SO obsessed with how she looks? Why are we so incredibly shocked that a woman who looks like her is allowed to embrace her own body? Madness. If she’s a good singer - buy her records, if she’s a good performer - buy tickets to see her in concert. But can we please stop this inane ‘oh look at her embracing her curves’ malarkey?