EL James to release Fifty Shades of Grey book from Christian Grey's perspective

hellomagazine.com

Her first book Fifty Shades of Grey became a worldwide bestseller, and now British author E.L James has decided to give the fans what they have "asked for", and release a new book - from male character Christian Grey's perspective. The book, to be called Grey, will tell the same story but from Christian's point of view, and not Anastasia Steele.


E.L James


On the opening page, E.L James writes: "This book is dedicated to those readers who asked…and asked… and asked… and asked for this."

In a statement announcing the new book, to be released on 18 June, the author, whose real name is Erika Leonard, adds: "Christian is a complex character, and readers have always been fascinated by his desires and motivations, and his troubled past.

"Also, as anyone who has ever been in a relationship knows, there are two sides to every story."


Sam Taylor-Johson, Jamie Dornan, Dakota Johnson and E.L James at the London premiere


She continues: "It’s been a great pleasure to return to my happy place – writing, being with Christian and Ana in their universe, and working with the fantastic publishing teams in the US and the UK."

The erotic drama, originally written as fanfiction for another worldwide phenomenon, Twilight, have sold 70 million copies worldwide - and the film adaptation, released in February 2015, pulled in a record £53million at box offices across the world, when it premiered over the Valentine's Day weekend.

A sequel was greenlit, and E.L James's husband, Neil Leonard, will write the screenplay.


Fifty Shades of Grey spawned two sequels


The film's stars, Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson, will return as Christian and Ana, although acclaimed director Sam Taylor-Johnson left the project in March.

E.L James has kept strong creative control over the film adaptations of her book trilogy – and reportedly clashed with Sam during filming.

"I'm not going to lie," Sam told Porter Magazine. "We definitely fought, but they were creative fights and we would resolve them."

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