Peaches Geldof's family home 'sells' more than a year after her death

hellomagazine.com

Peaches Geldof's family home has reportedly sold, 15 months after her tragic death. The five-bedroom property in Wrotham, Kent, where Peaches lived with her husband Thomas Cohen and their two sons, has been taken off the market after sitting empty for more than a year.

The 25-year-old daughter of Sir Bob Geldof was found in a bedroom in the house on 7 April last year, after suffering a fatal overdose. It is thought that heartbroken Thomas never returned to the property following her death, and it is has remained untouched ever since; recent pictures show the once-happy family home looking unkempt and deserted, an upsetting reminder of the tragedy.

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Peaches Geldof's former family home, pictured shortly after her death



Peaches and Thomas bought the property in 2013 to raise their children, Astala and Phaedra, in relative anonymity. After her death, the house was put on the market for £995,000 – it is not known who has bought the property, nor how much it has been sold for.

Peaches died in tragically similar circumstances to her mother Paula Yates, who was found at her Notting Hill home following an overdose.

In a heartbreaking interview in October, six months after Peaches passed away, her father admitted that he "blames himself" for her death. "You're the father who is responsible and clearly failed," he said.

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Peaches Geldof and husband Thomas Cohen with their sons Astala and Phaedra



"For anybody watching, who has a dead kid, and you're a parent. You go back, you go back, you go back, you go back, you go back, you go over, you go over. What could you have done? You do as much as you can."

Sir Bob also said he had known about Peaches' heroin addiction and had tried to help her through it. "Of course I knew about it and we did talk about it," he said. "She was super bright. Too bright. A very errant mind that could focus intensely on a book which she would consume and just absorb it.

"But the rest was a franticness. She knew what life was supposed to be and, God bless her, she tried very hard to get there. And she didn't make it."

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