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Joanna Lumley reveals what it's like to kiss Leonardo DiCaprio

hellomagazine.com

Joanna Lumley has opened up about her kiss with Leonardo DiCaprio for The Wolf of Wall Street, and has revealed that she was "anxious" to smooch the Oscar-winning star.

Chatting to Graham Norton on The Graham Norton Show, which will air on Friday night, Joanna said: "We went for it but there was a lot of peppermint involved as we were both quite anxious about it.

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Joanna spoke about her scene with Leonardo DiCaprio

"We were both very clean, like a surgery," the Absolutely Fabulous actor joked. "He was very charming."

The star joined her Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie co-stars Rebel Wilson and Jennifer Saunders on Graham's sofa to chat about the upcoming film, which sees Jennifer and Joanna's iconic characters Edina Monsoon and Patsy Stone fleeing the country after accidentally killing Kate Moss. Joking about the supermodel appearing in the film, Jennifer revealed: "The funny thing was I had sold the idea of the movie to the studio and the BBC and then realised I hadn't actually asked Kate. Luckily, she said yes and was really cool about it. "

The pair also spoke about the huge wait for the film to be released. "People asked me all the time and finally I thought it was a good idea to make it. I procrastinated for a long time – though I like to call it 'Thinking time,'" Jennifer said.

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Joanna appeared on The Graham Norton Show with her co-star, Jennifer Saunders

Although the sitcom was a smash hit, the comedy pair revealed that they didn't initially get on when they made the pilot episode. Joanna said: "It was very awkward at the read through. It was just the two of us and she just stared at me. I told my agent I didn’t want to do it and she said, "It’s just a pilot, just do it."'

Jennifer defended herself, saying: "Joanna just wasn’t what I had in mind for Patsy. I saw her a low-life journalist. But Joanna brought so much more to the role and we had fun inventing the character."

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