The Queen wears pink coat in nod to William and Kate's baby girl

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The Queen acknowledged the arrival of the new Princess of Cambridge on Saturday by wearing pink during her day of engagements. The sovereign, who now has five great-grandchildren, paid a sartorial tribute to William and Kate's newborn daughter by sporting a vibrant fuchsia coat and matching hat.

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Britain's monarch, who was visiting Richmond Castle in North Yorkshire, beamed joyfully at the crowd of attendees as she witnessed the amalgamation of 9th/12th and the Queen's Royal Lancers.

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The Queen gave a nod to the new Princess of Cambridge as she stepped out in pink on Saturday



Drops of rain couldn't dampen the Queen's spirits as she enthusiastically watched 252 troops and four horses marching in honour of the special occasion.

William and Kate's daughter is the first girl to have been born to a direct heir to the throne since the Queen herself gave birth to Princess Anne 64 years ago.



While the 89-year-old royal was in Yorkshire, her official residence Buckingham Palace played host to much excitement in London.

Shortly after it was announced on Kensington Palace's official Twitter account that the Duchess of Cambridge had welcomed a baby girl, the easel proclaiming the royal birth was placed outside the Queen's London home.

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The monarch's joie de vivre was evident as she as she witnessed the amalgamation of 9th/12th and the Queen's Royal Lancers



At 12.30pm a footman exited the palace's Privy Purse door carrying the all-important document, which he then placed on an ornate easel just behind the gates.

In keeping with royal tradition, the brief notice confirmed the news that the Duchess "was safely delivered of a daughter". Presented on palace-headed foolscap-sized paper, the framed bulletin also stated that the little Princess had come into the world at 8.34am, weighing 8lbs, 3oz.

The practice of posting the bulletin to announce a royal birth has been in place for at least as long as Buckingham Palace has been the official royal residence, dating back from 1837.

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