William and Kate win planning permission to build tennis court at Anmer Hall

hellomagazine.com

Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge, née Kate Middleton, have been granted planning permission to build a tennis court in the grounds of their Norfolkshire home, Anmer Hall. The couple, who are big tennis fans, filed a planning application in June to relocate the existing court at their country retreat after it fell into disrepair.

Documents released on the King's Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council website show that consent has been given for the work to be carried out on the Sandringham Estate following no objections from members of the public or the council.

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William and Kate have been granted permission to build a new tennis court

As part of the work, the couple's existing tennis court will be removed and turned into part of their back garden, with the new court set to be built 20 metres away. The creation of the new court will involve the removal of ten trees, but the plans involve the planting of three new oak trees to make up for their loss.

The planning application states that moving the tennis court "improves the views" from the ten-bedroom Hall and will have "no significant impact" on the publicly seen landscape.

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The royal couple are regular fixtures at Wimbledon

It comes as no surprise that William and Kate want to replace their tennis court; as keen tennis fans the couple are regular fixtures at Wimbledon, and sat in the royal box to watch Andy Murray play in the quarter-finals in July.

They have already carried out extensive work at Anmer Hall, which was a wedding gift from the Queen. As well as rebuilding a driveway and adding more shrubs and trees for extra security, the couple converted a 'garden store' into living quarters and created a pergola in front of their kitchen. The royals have also employed a new housekeeper to help run their country mansion.

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The couple will build the tennis court at Anmer Hall

The couple are raising their two children Prince George and Princess Charlotte at the country retreat in a bid to help them enjoy a "safe, happy and private childhood," however a letter released by Kensington Palace on Friday revealed the parents' fears over the "extreme lengths" that photographers will go to in order to capture images of their children.

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