Prince George 'being harassed by paparazzi', says Kensington Palace

hellomagazine.com

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, née Kate Middleton, have shared their fears over the "extreme lengths" that photographers will go to in order to capture images of Prince George. A letter issued by Kensington Palace has appealed to the world media to prevent the publication of unauthorised images of the two-year-old, stipulating that the Prince, like any other child, "deserves a safe, happy and private childhood".

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It states that "a line has been crossed" by some organisations using "increasingly dangerous" tactics, including the use of long range lenses to capture images of Kate and her son playing in private parks; monitoring George and his nanny; using other children to draw Prince George into view, and hiding on private property. The letter notes one recent "disturbing" incident when a photographer camped out in a car and was found hidden in the boot trying to shoot pictures.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL LETTER FROM KENSINGTON PALACE


"All of this has left the Duke and Duchess concerned about their ability to provide a childhood for Prince George and Princess Charlotte that is free from harassment and surveillance," it states. "They know that almost all parents love to share photos of their children and they themselves enjoy doing so. But they know every parent would object to anyone – particularly strangers – taking photos of their children without their permission."

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Acknowledging that the royal couple are "fortunate to have private homes where photographers cannot capture images of their children", the letter states that William and Kate "feel strongly that both Prince George and Princess Charlotte should not grow up exclusively behind palace gates and in walled gardens. They want both children to be free to play in public and semi-public spaces with other children without being photographed".

In the letter, the Duke and Duchess express their "gratitude" to the British media organisations for their policy of not publishing unauthorised photos of their children, and state that by making the letter public they hope to "inform the public discussion around the unauthorised photography of children".

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