Audrey Hepburn’s Burberry trench coat to be auctioned at Christie’s

The film star's personal possessions - including a Givenchy dress and a collection of ballet slippers - will be sold at Christie’s this autumn

hellomagazine.com

Adored for her timeless gamine style and irresistible girl next door charms, Audrey Hepburn is still a true fashion icon 24 years after her death. The Brussels-born actress was best known for her roles in Roman Holiday, Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Sabrina, and this autumn Christie’s auction house will be putting an impressive collection of Audrey’s personal possessions on sale. 

Audrey was known and adored for her sophisticated sense of style

The auction - which has been arranged by the two sons of the late film star - will take place on 27 September and feature a number of pristine pieces from Audrey’s incredible wardrobe. ‘We are thrilled to have been entrusted with the sale of items from Audrey Hepburn's personal collection,’  says Adrian Hume-Sayer, Director, Private Collections at Christie's. ‘Her name is one that instantly resonates, and her appeal and relevance remain as strong today as they ever were.’

Among the items on sale will be a beautiful satin Givenchy dress, a belted Burberry trench coat which is expected to fetch up to £8,000, and a collection of ballet pumps in a kaleidoscope of colours, from classic black to punchy turquoise.

The iconic actress starred in Funny Face

As well as the main auction in September, the sale will comprise an online element which will run until 3rd October. Pieces on offer will include behind-the-scenes photographs and sought-after scripts from films such as Breakfast at Tiffany's.

The star’s fashion appeal has certainly stood the test of time and many of her fans today include teenagers and tweens who have been born since her death in 1993. Audrey’s son, Sean Ferrer, plans to write a book for release next year which hones in on his mother’s sophisticated approach to style. 

See Lady Amelia Windsor's incredible look in the Dolce & Gabbana campaign...

More on: