David Oweyelo defends Benedict Cumberbatch following offensive remarks

hellomagazine.com

David Oweyelo has defended Benedict Cumberbatch, following the actor's comments about "coloured people." Speaking to HELLO! at the London premiere of Selma, the British actor said: "He's a beautiful human being and I know him very well as a person and I think what he was saying was also beautiful.

"The fact that a word obliterates the sentiment behind what he was trying to say is a huge shame. I think it is ingenuous: it's because we live in the age of the sound bite, instead of the age of substance."

David Oweyelo at the Selma premiere

David, who was overlooked for an Oscar for his stunning portrayal of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the film added: "Look at what the man was actually saying - and he didn't have to say it, he isn't affected by what he is saying. To latch on to this word is silly."

Benedict used the term during an interview in America on equality in cinema, where he shared his opinion that Hollywood offers more opportunities for black actors than the UK does.

He later apologised and said it was a "thoughtless use of inappropriate language", and said he makes no excuses for "being an idiot".

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He added that he was "devastated to have caused offence".

British actor David has received critical acclaim for his performance in Ava DuVernay's adaptation of the march which took place in the 1960s as Dr. Martin Luther King and his group, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, tried to eliminate the discriminatory practises which stopped black Americans from being allowed to vote whilst facing violent opposition from government, police forces, and the public.

"What struck me most was the fact that even though Dr. King was the figurehead it was a people movement, and it wasn't just a black movement, it was black white young old, who came together to speak out against injustice.", David revealed to HELLO!

He added: "And they did it peacefully, and that's such a poignant message for today."

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