Prince William pays tribute to 7/7 victims in London

hellomagazine.com

Ten years after London fell victim to a series of terrorist attacks, locals and key figures have paid tribute to those who died on 7 July 2005. On behalf of the royal family, Prince William attended a special memorial service at Hyde Park on Tuesday afternoon.

The event was organised by survivors and victims' families, who had asked if the Duke of Cambridge would attend as their guest.

It took place at the permanent memorial in the park, just a short drive away from William's London base Kensington Palace.

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Prince William laid flowers at the memorial in Hyde Park

The Duke, who was not joined by his wife the Duchess of Cambridge née Kate Middleton, was seen arriving at the service, dressed smartly in a navy suit and blue tie.

William laid flowers at the memorial and afterwards spoke to some of the survivors and families.

Earlier that morning Prime Minister David Cameron and the mayor of London Boris Johnson had visited the same site and laid wreaths at 8:50am – exactly ten years after the bombs went off on the Underground.

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The royal was joined by Labour MP Tessa Jowell at the ceremony

A total of 52 people were killed and more than 700 injured in the four terrorist attacks that day, three of which happened on the Tube and the fourth on a double-decker bus. The bombings, which were the worst single terrorist atrocity on British soil, were carried out by suicide bombers linked to al-Qaeda.

At the morning service, Mr Cameron said: "Ten years on from the 7/7 London attacks, the threat from terrorism continues to be as real as it is deadly. The murder of 30 innocent Britons whilst holidaying in Tunisia is a brutal reminder of that fact. But we will never be cowed by terrorism."

Flowers and cards were also laid at Russell Square, Edgware Road and Aldgate tube stations, where the bombs went off, and in Tavistock Square, where the bus was driving past.

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William met survivors and victims' families at the July bombings memorial service

A minute's silence was held at 11:30am to mark the tenth anniversary of the London transport attack, while commuters were also urged to walk part of their journey and show solidarity on social media by using the hashtag "#walktogether".

At St Paul's Cathedral, a national service of commemoration was held, in which the names of the 52 victims were read out and unity was the key message of the service.

"Beyond the numbing shock of what happened, there was solidarity," said Bishop of London Richard Chartres in his address. "There was unity in our grieving."

The service was attended by Prince Andrew in the place of his mother the Queen.

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