Serena-Williams-Archie-Harrison

Serena Williams reveals why she WON'T be attending Archie Harrison's christening

And shared her reaction to seeing the Duchess in the crowd on Thursday

Chloe Best

Serena Williams has confirmed she won’t be able to attend the christening of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s baby son Archie Harrison on Saturday, due to work commitments. The tennis player, who is set to compete in Wimbledon’s mixed doubles alongside Andy Murray on Friday, brushed off suggestions that she could be one of Archie’s godparents in a press conference after winning her second round match on Thursday.

Asked whether she would be attending the private royal celebration, Serena said: "No, I’m working on Saturday…so, she understands work." Serena also shared her reaction to Meghan’s surprise appearance at Wimbledon to support her in the competition. "Yes I knew she was there and it’s always exciting when she comes out to watch and support the tennis so I was happy," she said.

Serena Williams won't be able to attend Archie Harrison's christening

The 37-year-old also proved how close she and Meghan are, as she said her one-year-old daughter Olympia will be like a "big sister" to Archie. Asked whether she would like to teach the young royal to play tennis when he is older, Serena joked: "I don’t know, I’m actually working on Olympia’s game so maybe she can give tips to him."

MORE: Everything we know about Archie Harrison's christening

Prince Harry and Meghan are keen to keep Archie’s christening as private as possible, with the service set to take place at the chapel within Windsor Castle rather than at St. George’s Chapel as expected. They have reportedly invited less than 25 guests and said that they wouldn’t be sharing the identity of Archie’s godparents.

Meghan supported Serena at Wimbledon on Thursday

Despite their wishes, it's possible the names of the godparents could emerge in due course. The Church of England rules that details of all baptisms, including the godparents, are a matter of public record, and can be accessed by anyone who is prepared to pay a fee. However, it's unclear whether the same rules will apply in this case; because the building is a private royal chapel, the Queen is able to make the final decision - known as a 'royal peculiar' - and as such, the documentation may remain private.

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