babs-biggins

Christopher Biggins reveals 'saddest thing' about Dame Barbara Windsor's dementia struggle 

Find out what he had to say

Emmy Griffiths

Christopher Biggins has opened up about his good friend Dame Barbara Windsor, and revealed the "saddest thing" about her battle with dementia. According to the star, Barbara, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 2014, repeatedly asked him the same questions about himself over lunch. Chatting on Good Morning Britain, he explained: "I had lunch with her about five weeks ago, she was fantastic. She was really good and she was on form and we laughed a lot. I think what happens is that she remembers the past, but it's the way, way past. It's things that happens on the day, and the day before, that she struggles with."

Barbara and Christopher are old friends

He continued: "I think she asked me about six or seven times what I was doing, and where did I live... That's the saddest thing about it all. It's very tricky for her husband Scott, because he lives with it all the time. It's very frustrating." However, he added that the former EastEnders actress was in great spirits, explaining: "Scott does everything, they have people come in and do her makeup and hair, she's in a very good place I think. It's just these lapses in memory which are just awful."

READ: Barbara Windsor's husband reveals EastEnders star no longer recognises her own home

Christopher also spoke about what he did the first time he visited her after he found out about her diagnosis, and revealed that he made her laugh. He said: "I remember when she first had it and I was rather cruel, I went around and said, 'Hello Barbara. My name is Biggins.' She still has that great sense of humour, it's just a very sad situation."

Barbara with her husband, Scott

READ: EastEnders legend Dame Barbara Windsor makes rare appearance – see pic

Barbara's husband Scott has previously opened up about her dementia on GMB, explaining: "Our reality is, for instance the last few weeks, her confusion is really bad. I spend a lot of time explaining where we are. She has a lot of trouble identifying our house. She will say, 'Are we staying here tonight? Have we got clothes here?' That's the reality of what people living with dementia are going through."