Downton Abbey's Lady Mary and Matthew Crawley reunite

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Downton Abbey's Lady Mary and her husband Matthew Crawley have been reunited. The cast of the popular period drama came together to attend a special BAFTA tribute ceremony in London on Tuesday night, with actor Dan Stevens re-joining the cast almost three years after his character was killed off in an emotional Christmas Day episode.

Michelle Dockery was thrilled to be reunited with her on-screen husband and shared a photo of the pair posing together - much to the excitement of Downton Abbey fans.

Reunited. @thatdanstevens I've missed this face #bafta #LastDaysOfDownton #matthewandmary

A photo posted by Michelle Dockery (@theladydockers) on

Michelle Dockery and Dan Stevens were reunited on Tuesday

"Reunited. @thatdanstevens I've missed this face #bafta #LastDaysOfDownton #matthewandmary," she captioned the black and white snap, which showed a smiling Michelle placing an arm around Dan, who looked dapper in a dark navy suit and bow tie.

Dan famously played Matthew Crawley for the first three series of Downton Abbey before he was killed off in a car accident, leaving Lady Mary a widow to care for their son George. Since leaving the show he has gone on to star on Broadway in The Heiress, and will take the role as Beast in the upcoming live action remake of Disney's Beauty and the Beast opposite Emma Watson.

The former co-stars were celebrating six successful years of the period drama, which will draw to a close in December. After winning three Golden Globes and 11 Emmy Awards, it was announced in March that Downton will finish this year.

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Michelle Dockery was joined by the twins who play her on-screen son George

The final eight-part series will air in September and finish on Christmas Day, however fans of the show are still holding out hope that it will return for a movie in the future.

"I'd like the idea of a film because of course with a film budget you could do things you can't do on television," creator Julian Fellowes explained to the BBC. "You could open the whole thing up in a way that rather appeals to me. But you know, we'll have to see."

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