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How to follow Garden Rescue's Harry and David Rich's exciting new project

The duo will be leaving the BBC show soon

Eve Crosbie

Harry and David Rich of the Rich Brothers may soon be departing Garden Rescue, but fans of the dynamic duo need not worry as they can continue to follow them and all their gardening tips thanks to their new personal project.

MORE: Why the Rich Brothers and Arit Anderson are leaving Garden Rescue

Titled Ty gardd, which is Welsh for 'garden house', the online diary will document the process of transforming the sprawling garden of Harry's home in Brecon, Wales, through both beautiful imagery and in-depth posts.

As the website reads: "Ty gardd is a diary of our first personal garden. It is a process that will no doubt become a lifetime of work and one that we will undertake together.

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WATCH: Are you a fan of Garden Rescue?

They added that their followers will also get a glimpse at their design process, material choices, plant selection, notebook entries, as well as the "the ebbs and flows of being more sustainable".

MORE: Take a look at the Garden Rescue stars' own gardens 

MORE: Garden Rescue's Harry Rich shows off incredible hidden talent

Since launching the project at the start of the year, they have posted seven updates about the garden transformation. In one, they go into detail about their proposed plans for the garden. "We love formality," they write.

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Together Harry and David are transforming Harry's garden

"The strong lines of topiary, pleached trees and stone walls provide the garden with fairness and balance but without its opposite can feel a little too regular. Cobbled paths allowed to diffuse into the lawn, soft undulating landforms and rambling roses spilling out from trees. Its a garden of conflict but hopefully one that sits well. "

MORE: Meet the new experts on Garden Rescue

Harry, 29, shares the Welsh cottage with his wife, Sue, a yoga instructor and newborn daughter. Last year, he opened up The Times about what attracted him to the property, which he purchased in 2017.

"It's a very old stone cottage, from 1670 in the oldest part, and it's got a stone floor with mud underneath. It is set in a woodland and you have to walk over a stream to get to it. I fell in love with the way I get to my front door."

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