Ryanair passengers check in

Ryanair has made a big change to its hand luggage allowance

The airline hopes the move will ease delays

Chloe Best

If you've got a flight planned with Ryanair in the next few months, take note. The budget airline has announced changes to its hand luggage allowance, meaning passengers will no longer be able to take two pieces of cabin luggage on board.

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The old policy allowed customers to carry on a normal cabin bag, such as a wheelie case that measured 50cm x 40cm x 20cm, along with a smaller bag such as a handbag under 35cm x 20cm x 20cm. However from 1 November passengers will only be able to take their smaller handbag or small backpack on board, with any normal sized wheelie cases placed in the hold free of charge - as long as they weigh less than 10kg.

Ryanair has changed its hand luggage policy

If customers do want to bring two bags on board, they'll have to pay an extra £5 at the time of booking for Priority Boarding. Ryanair say they are making the changes in a bid to ease delays that are often caused due to a lack of overhead space in the cabin. They said that customers have been "abusing" the previous policy by taking too much on board, and there simply isn't space for all passengers to take a wheelie suitcase on board.

The new policy means that all customers can check in one small 10kg suitcase for free, but as the bags are checked in at the gate they will still need to go through security, so they can't include sharp items or any liquids over 100ml.

Ryanair passengers check inVIEW GALLERY

Customers will now only be able to take one small item of hand luggage on board

At the same time, Ryanair has announced that they are reducing the price of additional hold luggage from €35 to €25, and increasing the weight allowance from 15kg to 20kg. Although the airline hopes that the changes will speed up boarding and prevent delayed departures, many people have pointed out that it will likely delay passengers upon arrival if they are forced to wait at baggage reclaim to collect their luggage.

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It is not the first time the airline has disgruntled passengers over changes to its policies; the airline now charges from £4 per return flight for seat reservations, and up to £22 per return flight for extra leg room. Recent research by an Oxford University mathematician finding that flyers were more likely to win the lottery than be randomly allocated the window or aisle seat, unless they paid to choose their seat. Many couples and groups have complained that they have been split up with separate middle seats on different rows despite the seats around them showing as empty.

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