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DNA braids are the latest insta-hair trend to hit your feed

When beauty meets science...

Anna Johnstone

You may think that you’ve seen every Instagram hair trend under the sun, but we can guarantee you haven’t seen latest viral trend since your old GCSE biology textbook. DNA hair is the latest ‘thing’, but don’t be put off by its scientific name - it’s actually very pretty, and can be worn in a number of different ways. Instead of simple plaiting or braiding, the hair is twisted round to give that double helix effect, but it looks much more glam than the plastic models in our old science classrooms.

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Braidgren, who calls herself a self-taught DIY braider showcased her look with bright green and blue hair and later uploaded a video showing fans how to recreate it at home. Although it looks very complicated, after a few loops, you can see the method a little more clearly (perhaps it’s best to try it out on a friend or daughter first, before you attempt doing the back of your own head…).

 

A post shared by Essi Rundgren (@braidgren) on

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She’s not the only one who’s given the look a try, as Alexandra Lee, a hairstylist from Rhode Island showed the hairstyle on her rainbow hair, opting for a half up look instead.

And Lorraine Cusack wore them on her blonde hair as pigtails, and then also created a stunning look on a redhead model. She used criss-cross braids closer to the scalp, and started the double helix at the nape of the neck. Maybe not one to try on your first go...

 

A post shared by Lorraine Cusack (@lorrainecusack) on

RELATED: For more Instagram-worthy hair to lust over, check our caramel latte hair

 

A post shared by Lorraine Cusack (@lorrainecusack) on

We love these intricate looks, as they show just how creative you can be with hair, and how you can grab inspiration for literally anywhere. Because who says beauty fantastics can’t also be science obsessed? Think of it this way: if fishtail braids are Year 9 SATs, DNA braids are A level.

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