King Charles' eco changes at the Queen's former home

The royal is passionate about the environment

King Charles III, 74, has been busy adapting to his new role as the monarch, and on Wednesday he held an official meeting at Balmoral Castle, revealing a new eco addition in the process.

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Charles had a meeting with Governor of Victoria Linda Dessau at the Scottish residence, where he has been spending time following the end of the official royal mourning period.

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A new photo released of the meeting revealed what appeared to be a smart meter positioned on the mantle inside of one of the castle's grand rooms.

It is well documented that His Majesty, once known as Prince Charles, is an advocate for environmental causes so this subtle but impactful change will come as no surprise.

A new photo revealed a smart meter at Balmoral castle

Since Charles took over the management of the Sandringham Estate in 2017, he has implemented a number of sustainable measures.

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The changes at the Norfolk residence, which have gradually taken place, include steps towards making the surrounding farm fully organic.

Speaking to Country Life in a previous interview, Charles outlined the ethos behind his grand plans: "It has always seemed to me somewhat logical to embrace a farming system that works with nature and not against her."

Buckingham Palace is undergoing changes too

Buckingham Palace is already undergoing modernisation works which will make the running of it more eco-friendly. This wasn't an initiative created by the King though, instead this was brought about when his mother, Queen Elizabeth II was on the throne.

The £369million project commenced in 2017 and is a ten-year plan to overhaul many parts of the Grade I listed building including the electrics and plumbing.

The official royal website explains that "the palace's electrical cabling, plumbing and heating have not been updated since the 1950s. The building's infrastructure is in urgent need of a complete overhaul to prevent long-term damage to the building and its contents".

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