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Loose Women star Linda Robson reveals the surprising way she is spending lockdown

The TV star is currently self-isolating at home

Gemma Strong

Linda Robson returned to Loose Women in January after an extended leave of absence – and it seems she is already missing her ITV colleagues. The 62-year-old star took to Instagram this week to share a video with her followers, updating them on how she is occupying her time during the coronavirus lockdown. Linda can be seen sitting on a comfy blue velvet chair, holding a cup of tea. Speaking to the camera, she shared: "I should be sitting on a nice beach somewhere sunning myself, but because of obviously what's going on in this country, I can't be. So here I am – with Ernie [the dog] – and my cup of tea, watching these old birds on the telly." The camera then pans to show a large TV mounted on the wall, showing a repeated episode of the show, featuring Linda and Janet Street-Porter.

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WATCH: Linda Robson tunes into Loose Women during coronavirus lockdown

Fans of the star were delighted to see her looking so happy and healthy. In January, Linda bravely detailed her battle with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, anxiety and depression, and a six-week stint in a treatment facility. During an appearance on Loose Women, the actress - who took a year off from the ITV daytime show - explained that her OCD reached severe levels as a result of taking medication for sleep. "I went to see somebody about it and they gave me a tablet," Linda explained. "But I had a really bad reaction to it. I had a proper meltdown, I got really bad anxiety, I got really bad depression and my OCD kicked into overdrive."

MORE: Loose Women's Linda Robson gives fans a peek inside her family home

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Linda returned to Loose Women in January

Linda went on to reveal that friend and fellow panellist Stacey Solomon helped her on her journey to recovery after spotting signs of her OCD, such as seeing her need her phone on full charge at all times. The mum-of-four explained: "I'd have the mobile chargers, like five or six of them, ready to charge if it ran out." After six weeks in the facility, Linda came out on more medication than before and it was making her hyper, leading her to turn to alcohol. "The medication they were giving me was making me hyper instead of it calming me down so then I started drinking again because I couldn't face the day," she said.