royal-baby

Revealed: Why the Royal Family christen their children at a young age

Royal babies are typically baptised around three months

Sophie Hamilton

It was revealed this week that Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank sadly had to postpone their son August's christening in July due to a guest self-isolating.

August Brooksbank is five months old and was set to be baptised in a private ceremony with the Queen and his aunt Princess Beatrice present.

MORE: 16 beautiful royal christening moments in pictures

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WATCH: A closer look at the royal christening gown

The royal family has a tradition of christening their babies at a very young age, usually under six months old.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge christened Prince George at three months old, Princess Charlotte at two months and Prince Louis at three months of age. Meanwhile, Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan christened Archie Harrison just two months old.

MORE: 24 sweet royal mum moments: Duchess Kate, Princess Eugenie and more

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Princess Charlotte's christening

Princess Diana held christenings for her sons William and Harry at two and three months old respectively, while Princess Beatrice was four months for her baptism.

Interestingly, Sarah Ferguson waited nine months to christen Princess Eugenie. According to People, the then-Duchess waited for Prince Andrew to return from his work as a naval flight commander.

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Princess Diana with Prince Harry in the family gown

So why do royals choose to christen their children at such young ages?

Along with the fact that young babies look adorable in their christening gown and dipping their head in water is probably a little easier, there's another very practical reason.

Royal babies traditionally wear the Honiton lace christening gown, ever since it was made for Queen Victoria's daughter in 1841.

The beautiful gown is designed for a small baby, hence why royals opt for baptisms when their infants can still fit into it.

The Queen, Prince Charles, Prince William and many more royals were all christened wearing the special family heirloom.

MORE: Carole Middleton launches fancy dress range her royal grandchildren will adore

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The Queen with baby Prince Charles

However, following the baptism of Lady Louise Windsor in 2004, it was decided the ancient garment was too delicate to be used again. As a result, the Queen commissioned an exact replica of the 1841 christening gown to replace the original robe.

The new gown has since been worn by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's three children, Archie Harrison and James, Viscount Severn.

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