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Why Zara Tindall's dramatic birth was very similar to the Queen's

The monarch's granddaughter has followed in her footsteps with childbirth

Mike Tindall has revealed how his wife Zara Tindall, the Queen's granddaughter, gave birth to their third child on the bathroom floor as there wasn't enough time to get to hospital. The royal couple welcomed a son, Lucas Philip Tindall, at their home in Gatcombe Park on Sunday 21 March, weighing 8lbs 4oz.

Interestingly, this is the first royal home birth since the Queen's late sister, Princess Margaret, welcomed her daughter, Lady Sarah, at home in Kensington Palace in 1964.

The monarch also had her four children at home in Buckingham Palace and Clarence House, so it's nearly 60 years since the last royal baby was born at home!

MORE: Why Princess Anne is celebrating the birth of Zara Tindall's third child differently

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Speaking on The Good, The Bad & The Rugb‪y podcast, proud father Mike said: "Sunday got even better because a little baby boy arrived at my house," adding how little Lucas, "Arrived very quickly. Didn’t make it to hospital. On the bathroom floor."

He told listeners: "So yeah, it was running to the gym, get a mat, get into the bathroom, get the mat on the floor, towels down, brace, brace, brace."

MORE: 10 most beautiful royal pregnancy photos of all time – from Duchess Kate to Princess Diana

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Zara and Mike Tindall

Mike also added how his wife’s friend Dolly, who was also at the birth of their two daughters, Mia and Lena, was present: "She was there and recognised that we wouldn’t have got to hospital in time."

He added: "Fortunately the midwife who was going to meet us at the hospital wasn’t that far away so she drove up just as we had assumed the posit (position) and the second midwife arrived just after the head had arrived."

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The Tindalls with daughter Mia

Mike said that their daughters were elsewhere for the day because Zara had been having contractions through the night.

He also spoke of the pros of having a home birth, revealing: "The best thing about being at home, the best thing was, as soon as he’s wrapped up, he’s skin on skin, straight downstairs. TV room. Golf on. This is what we’re doing."

Zara's home birth takes us back to when Her Majesty the Queen welcomed Prince Edward in 1964 – and while Zara's home birth is a little more dramatic than the monarch's on the bathroom floor, the grandmother and granddaughter have shared a similar experience.

Prince Charles was born via Caesarean section on the evening of 14 November 1948, in the Buhl Room at Buckingham Palace. According to Town and Country magazine, the room, which was ordinarily used as a guest room, was converted into a 'miniature hospital'.

MORE: The Queen's sweet reaction as Zara Tindall welcomes baby boy

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The Queen with baby Prince Charles

The Daily Mail revealed: "When the King's private secretary Tommy Lascelles brought the good news, Philip bounded upstairs into the Buhl Room, which had been converted into an operating theatre. He then held his firstborn, still wearing his sporting flannels and open-neck shirt."

Princess Anne Elizabeth Alice Louise was born on 15 August 1950 at 11.50am – this time at Clarence House due to the palace being renovated following the war. And it was another boy, Prince Andrew, for the Queen and Prince Phillip on 19 February 1960, who, like Charles, was born at Buckingham Palace in the Belgian suite.

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Baby Prince Edward makes a balcony appearance

Prince Edward Antony Richard Louis arrived in the world on 10 March 1964, again at Buckingham Palace, and it was the first birth that Prince Phillip had attended with his wife.

An article in the New York Times revealed: "The baby was placed in the cream-coloured iron cradle originally made for his mother. Later he will be transferred to the Moses Basket, which was the property of the late Queen Mary, the present Queen's grandmother."


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