netflix-trial-4

Fans saying same thing about Netflix new true crime series Trial 4

Are you watching the documentary?

Francesca Shillcock

This week, Netflix released a brand new true crime docuseries in the form of Trial 4. The eight-part series documents the story of Sean K. Ellis, an American man who served 22 years in the prison after being wrongfully convicted for the murder of a Boston police officer in 1993. The show tells his story of how he sought to prove his innocence and fight for justice.

MORE: Netflix's Carmel: Who Killed Maria Marta? is the new true-crime show you need to watch

It seems that many viewers at home were in agreement that the programme proved to be a difficult watch but important watch, and many took to social media to share their thoughts.

Loading the player...

WATCH: Netflix official trailer for Trial 4

One person wrote: "Been glued to Trial 4 on Netflix today. The brazen police corruption is not really a surprise, there's so many stories like this sadly #Trial4." Another echoed this, commenting: "#Trial4 on Netflix is a riveting docuseries. My heart hurt for what Sean Ellis went through. Thank god he had such dedicated people in his corner to help him prove his innocence."

MORE: Fans saying same thing about The Secret: Dare to Dream on Netflix

MORE: Fans have mixed views on Netflix announcing season two of Emily in Paris

trial-4-netflix

Trial 4 landed on Netflix this week

Plenty of others had similar views on the show. " I'm only halfway into #Trial4 on @netflix and I can literally feel my blood about to boil! I had to step away from my laptop," said another fan, while their fellow twitter user wrote: "At the risk of repeating myself #Trial4 on Netflix is a really good watch. I'm basically shouting at the telly."

Some fans were eager to express the importance of knowing Sean's story. "Watching #Trial4 on Netflix and I hate watching things like this but it's so important to watch and learn. @netflix #SeanEllis."

trail-4-netflix-2

Sean was wrongfully convicted for murder in 1993

Despite having no criminal record and assuring his innocence, Sean, who was 19 at the time, was arrested for murdering police detective John Mulligan and appeared in court three times in a year. His lawyers argued that he was being used as a scapegoat to solve a high-profile murder, and that Sean was the victim of systemic racism. Sean's conviction was eventually overturned in 2015.

Netflix's synopsis reads: "Ellis's story, while devastating, sheds light on timely issues of systemic racism, police corruption and criminal justice reform while offering hope that, ultimately, people have the power to change the system."

Like this story? Sign up to our newsletter to get other stories like this delivered straight to your inbox.

Activate HELLO! alerts and find out about everything before anyone else.