sunburn-treatments

How to treat sunburn this summer: best tips and tricks

Caught the sun by surprise? Find out how to treat sun-scorched skin quickly

Fiona Ward

We've all been caught out in the sun at some point, right? Despite our best intentions slathering on the SPF, covering up and staying in the shade when we can, chances are we'll all suffer from a little sunburn at some point. Of course, the best thing is to avoid getting burnt in the first place – regular sunburn may produce serious consequences for your skin in the long term – but if you do find yourself feeling red and sore, there are steps you can take to soothe your skin and get it back to normal as soon as possible. 

sunburn-treatment

Ouch! Sunburn can put a dampener on your summer fun

If the sunburn is serious, with cracking, blisters or swelling of the skin, or accompanied by severe heat exhaustion or sun stroke symptoms – such as headaches, fever, dizziness or sickness – you should always seek medical assistance. Equally, if your baby or young child is suffering with sunburn, always consult a doctor if concerned.

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In the case of light to moderate sunburn, though, there are simple steps you can take to improve your symptoms. The aim is to find a treatment that will repair the skin and help it regenerate, as well as calming the heat, irritation and itching.

Cool the area

Get out of the sun as soon as possible - a cold shower or cold flannel will help cool the skin and reduce irritation. If you can, sitting in front of a fan as you apply moisturising lotion or Aloe Vera (more on that below!) will help the skin settle, too.

moisturise-sunburn

Keep sunburnt skin moisturised

Get the right products

Make sure the area is well moisturised to prevent scabs forming and flakiness. Traditional after-sun lotions often contain alcohols which give an instant cooling sensation, but are generally no more effective than a traditional moisturiser! Store your favourite light lotion (try one that's designed for sensitive skin for those soothing ingredients) in the fridge instead, or use a pure Aloe Vera gel for a naturally cooling effect. If you're really suffering, take an Aspirin - it won't just relieve the pain, but will also have an anti-inflammatory effect.

Don't use Vaseline!

A common myth is that petroleum jelly is good for sunburn - but it will only trap heat in the skin. It's best to avoid anything very thick, greasy or oily.

sun-products

Try Ultrasun's range for staying safe in the sun, and Green People's soothing after-sun lotion

Take care when showering

When you shower, don't let the stream of water fall directly on the affected area. Hygiene should of course be observed, but avoid scented soaps, cosmetics and perfumes. Don't apply ice or ice packs directly to the skin, either! Wrap them in a clean dishcloth or towel.

Drink plenty of water

You need to replace lost fluids, so make sure that glass of water is regularly re-filled.

meghan-hat

Make like Meghan and wear a chic sun hat - and keep hydrated!

Avoid the sun while your skin heals

Make sure you don't forget the suncream a second time, wear a hat and always carry a light wrap to cover up if the sun is brighter than you realised. Up your SPF factor, too - we like Ultrasun's SPF 50+ (available here). 

Wear loose clothing

While your skin heals, avoid tight clothing that will irritate and even heat the area. Loose-fitting, flowing clothes are your friend! 

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Don't fuss with your sunburn

Aside from applying product, try not to scratch or touch the affected skin too much - if it starts to peel, don't try to remove the flakes. Don't be tempted to pop any blisters, either. It will only slow down the healing process!

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